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Green Lives to Ride Horses in KPRA

Reid Green competes in ranch bronc riding during Friday’s first go-round of the Kansas Professional Rodeo Association Finals. Green scored 74 points to win the opening round and move closer to the KPRA title.

Reid Green competes in ranch bronc riding during Friday’s first go-round of the Kansas Professional Rodeo Association Finals. Green scored 74 points to win the opening round and move closer to the KPRA title.

DODGE CITY, Kan. – Wild horses are part legend, part fascination and part of reliving the Old West.

They’re also the focal point for Reid Green, a 38-year-old cowboy from Laverne, Okla. He is competing in both saddle bronc riding and ranch bronc riding at the Kansas Professional Rodeo Association Finals this weekend at Roundup Arena.

On Friday night, he posted a 74-point ride in ranch bronc riding to win the opening go-round and extend his lead in the KPRA standings.

“It’d be pretty good to do well in the go-rounds,” said Green, who owns a lead of more than $2,000 over the No. 2 man in the standings, Riggen Herbert of Scott City, Kan. “I just need to go win the rounds and have fun doing it.”

That’s exactly how Green sees his opportunity to ride bucking horses. He grew up on a ranch near Laverne and still has a small ranch there, but he has a full time job pumping wells in the oil fields.

“I grew up ranching, and I had to go get a real job,” he said with a laugh, knowing full well the labor that goes into ranch work. “We have a small ranch, but it’s just enough to be a hobby ranch.

“All we do is make money in the oil field, then go back to riding horses and having fun. I have my kids involved in it, so that’s what it’s about.”

He’s done pretty well at it. He won the KPRA ranch bronc riding title a year ago and has a strong chance to repeat. While he won the opening round in that event, he didn’t fare so well in the other; he was bucked off at about the 4-second mark.

There are several differences between the two events; ranch bronc riding features a traditional saddle, while he uses a specialized saddle in traditional rodeo saddle bronc riding that has no saddle horn and features free-swinging stirrups that allow for a classic spur stroke. He also can use two hands in ranch bronc riding, while he must avoid touching the animal, himself or his equipment with a free hand in the other.

“I like saddle bronc riding; it’s more of a challenge,” Green said. “I’m still struggling with it. I’d like to get better at it.

“I wasn’t riding saddle broncs last year. That horse I had tonight is probably my 10th or 11th horse I’ve ever been on in the saddle bronc riding.”

Just qualifying for the KPRA Finals in both events is a testament to Green, but he knows he’s just a beginner in saddle bronc riding.

“I just get on as many horses as I can,” he said. “Every now and again I can get on a practice horse. I don’t have a lot of time to do that, so I just practice on the (stationary) spur board and on the ground.”

Now his focus is strictly on clinching the ranch bronc riding championship this weekend in Dodge City’s Roundup Arena.

“Dodge City has been a great home, really accommodating,” Green said. “It’s a really good rodeo.”

Courtesy of twisTEDrodeo.com