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Cody Snow

Cody Snow – Los Olivos, Calif. ($95,054)
4-time WNFR qualifier

Seven years ago, when Cody Snow was still a teenager, he made an investment that has had a very positive influence in his life.

That was when he purchased a four-year-old mare, Ima Fresnos Dee, that has been partially responsible for his four trips to the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo. He calls the mare Annie and he is the only person that has ever roped on her.

She was barely started when he got her. He took her to brandings and brought calves to the fire. He heeled a donkey on her and spent hours in the saddle checking and doctoring yearlings in the pasture during the first year he had her.

When she was five, he started heading steers on her. That was also his first year of rodeo competition in the PRCA, 2015. He won the Rookie of the Year title in the heading while roping with Dugan Kelly. Cody finished the season in 20th place. The next year he and Dugan were roping at Cody’s first NFR.

This year marks his fourth NFR. He has roped at the last two with Wesley Thorp and they will be partnered again in the Thomas and Mack this year. Cody starts the competition in eighth place with $95,054 in regular season earnings.

They had their best year in 2018 earning $104,910 in Las Vegas. Cody finished the season in fourth place. He nearly had to compete at the NFR without Annie.

While traveling and after an overnight stop over the Fourth-of-July, he noticed swelling in Annie’s knee. She had a bone chip and infection that required surgery. With everything stabilized, Annie made the trip to Brazos Valley Equine where the surgery was performed. Then she spent time there on their Aquatred machine getting rehabilitation.

Everything they did worked and Annie’s desire to get back to competition was evident. An injury that normally takes at least six months to recover from only took three and Cody got to ride her at the NFR.

Cody’s late father, Van Snow, was a noted equine orthopedic veterinarian and along with giving his son a start in roping, he also taught him about horse care. That has all come in handy in his chosen career.

While Cody’s father never got to see his son compete for rodeo’s championships, plenty of friends and family have. His support system grows each year and there will be plenty of people cheering for him this December in Las Vegas.

Presented by Classic Equine

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